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DHV100_1

Philosophy of Health Sciences

This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.


This course aims at an advanced understanding of philosophy of health sciences for researchers by examining the epistemic and ethical conditions of caring for the health of another. The course proceeds from the practice of dialogue as the ultimate foundation of caregiver and caretaker alike (whether patient or relative), namely a conversation through which the story co-authored by caretaker and caregiver becomes the basis for health care, and thus also a fundamental condition for the empirical fields the researcher in health sciences and medicine meets. Even the most remote statistical, experimental or laboratory research is intelligible only on the assumption that it ultimately refers to a mutual understanding of healthcare between a caregiver and a caretaker. The course probes the researcher into some of the dialogical conditions of mutually, openly and respectfully listening and talking towards greater understanding of healthcare in particular cases.
How people tell the story of needed care assumes what humans are and how they become known. The course continues with an exploration of what research on human cognitive and emotive abilities assumes and implies in the context of healthcare. It focuses on various understandings of humans in terms of consciousness, intentionality and language, and how such understandings affect the way the researcher conceives of the object of health research. It clarifies knowledge, belief, sensation, perception, memory, thinking, and imagination as well as emotions, affections, appetites, attitudes and agitations. The aim of the course is here to further the candidate's self-knowledge as researcher and her/his knowledge of caretakers in the context of advanced research on healthcare.
The practice of healthcare also grounds how caregivers and caretakers should act. It is only in the story that caretaker and caregiver tell together, that particular actions and courses of action can be adequately understood and evaluated, since that narrative precedes, shapes and justifies the being and becoming of the caretaker in the hands of the caregiver. For instance, the narrative articulates the relationship of caretaker and caregiver to each other, to the common good of health and to the institutions through which power and money are distributed. However, the morality peculiar to the modern western world, tell caretakers and caregivers to conceive of themselves as consumers and producers, which may conflict with the practice of how one should receive and give healthcare. This part of the course therefore enables the researcher to critically understand and evaluate the ethics of health sciences in the context of the dialogical narrative of desire and deliberation of situated individual caregivers and caretakers

Learning outcome

The following learning outcomes will be achieved by the PhD candidate on completion of the course:
Knowledge
The PhD candidate will:
  • achieve collaborative knowledge of dialogue and narrative in healthcare research.
  • achieve advanced knowledge of the cognitive, cogitative and emotive abilities of human beings.
  • achieve advanced knowledge of the ethics involved in healthcare research.

Skills
By the end of the course, the PhD candidate will be able to:
  • address the complex conditions of dialogue and narrative in healthcare in relation to an ongoing research project.
  • investigate human cognitive, cogitative and emotive abilities in relation to an ongoing research project.
  • critically understand and evaluate the different senses of desiring and deliberating about healthcare in the context of advanced modernity in relation to an ongoing research project.

General competence
By the end of the course, the PhD candidate will be able to:
  • identify relevant challenges in co-authoring narratives of healthcare as a researcher.
  • express a refined understanding of her/his own thoughts and feelings as well as those of caretakers.
  • assess potentially conflicting notions of desire and deliberation in healthcare ethics.

Contents

The course will interrelate lectures, dialogues and self-study. The participants will contribute individually in dialogues and presentations towards a mutual understanding of the learning outcomes. Lectures and dialogues will take place during two full weeks, one at the beginning and one in the middle of the semester. A detailed timetable will be made available at the beginning of the semester.

Required prerequisite knowledge

Master level within medicine, health sciences, societal safety, social science, or similar educations.

Exam

Weight Duration Marks Aid
An individual paper of 5000 words (+/- 10%) in English on a self-chosen topic approved by the professors and connected to the researcher's ongoing PhD project in the health sciences. The paper must be submitted within six weeks after the end of the course and will be evaluated as Pass/Fail.

Coursework requirements

Outline, Draft
  • Submission of a one page outline of a course paper answering the following question: What philosophical anthropology and moral philosophy do your research project in health sciences involve? This is to be sent to the course administrator one week ahead of the first course week.
  • Active participation in lectures and dialogues.
  • Submission of a draft of the course paper one week ahead of the second course week and presentation of it in a seminar during the second course week.

Course teacher(s)

Course teacher
Kari Vevatne , Sebastian Rehnman
Course coordinator
Sebastian Rehnman

Method of work

Submission of a one page outline of a course paper answering the following question: What does your research project in the health sciences assume about what human beings are and how they ought to be cared for? This is to be sent to the course administrator one week ahead of the first course week. Active participation in lectures and dialogues. Submission of a draft of the course paper one week ahead of the second course week and presentation of it in a seminar during the second course week. The paper should argue for the philosophical anthropology and moral philosophy of your research project in the health sciences.

Open to

Candidates with a relevant master's degree may apply for admission to the course.

Literature

Bakhtin, Mikhail M. Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics, translated and edited by Caryl Emerson (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1984), chapter 5.
Baldwin, Clive. "Narrative ethics for narrative care." Journal of Aging Studies 34 (2015): 183-189.
Buber, Martin. Dialogue in Between Man and Man, translated by Ronald Gregor-Smith (London: Routledge, 2002), pp. 1-45. German original Zwiesprache in several editions.
Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette, Sofie T. L. Verhaeghe, and Marijke C. Kars. "Researching Lived Experience in Health Care: Significance for Care Ethics." Nursing Ethics: An International Journal for Health Care Professionals 18, no. 2 (2011): 232-242.
Gadamer, Hans-Georg. Enigma of Health: The Art of Healing in a Scientific Age, translated by Jason Gaiger and Nicholas Walker (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996), selection. German original Über die Verborgenheit der Gesundheit.
Hacker, P. M. S. The Intellectual Powers: A Study of Human Nature (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013).
Hacker, P. M. S. The Passions: A Study of Human Nature (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018), pp. 3-128.
Held, Virginia. The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
Levinas, Emmanuel. "The Face" in Ethics and Infinity: Conversations with Philippe Nemo, translated by Richard A. Cohen (Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1985), pp. 85-92. French original Ethique et infini.
MacIntyre, Alasdair C. Ethics in the Conflicts of Modernity: An Essay on Desire, Practical Reasoning, and Narrative. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016), pp. 1-242.
Roberts, Robert. "Narrative Ethics." Philosophy Compass 7, no. 3 (2012): 174-182.


This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.

Sist oppdatert: 23.07.2019

History